Get Out (2017) Analysis: This Film will change your Perspective on Life

Get Out is an incredibly surprising film. It combines aspects of comedy, horror and science fiction into one powerful statement on race in the 21st century. If you have not yet seen Get Out I strongly encourage you to watch the film as soon as possible because it is one of those rare films that changes your perspective for life.

Get Out stars Daniel Kaluuya as an African American man named Chris Washington who visits the family of his girlfriend Rose Armitage. Chris is concerned that his girlfriend has not yet told her parents that he is black. Once they arrive at Rose’s family home, strange things start happening. The family employs two african americans as caretakers and Rose’s mom hypnotizes Chris to make him quit smoking. Each member of the family is awkwardly focused on Chris’s skin color to the point that he feels uncomfortable but he stays because he is committed to his relationship with Rose. Eventually we discover that the Armitage family has a secret plan to sell Chris’s body to the highest bidder and surgically transfer another person’s brain into Chris’s body. It’s a stunning twist that leaves you utterly breathless because it completely changes how you view the rest of the movie. The remainder of the movie involves Chris as he attempts to escape the family’s clutches and avoid the unfortunate fate of so many other African Americans.

This film is written and directed by Jordan Peele who is well known as a member of the comedy duo Key and Peele. I am not familiar with his comedic work but judging by the quality of Get Out I can say that this man is enormously talented. My favorite thing about Get Out is how the film balances elements of so many different genres. This has the effect of making you unsure whether you should laugh, cry or cringe at the events taking place on screen. Where most movies struggle to utilize one tone, Get Out triumphs at integrating multiple tones into one film.

I will say that this film is fairly slow through the first act. While mysterious events kept me intrigued, there was simply not enough in terms of character work to keep me engaged in the story. It appears that Jordan Peele’s strength lies in comedy and plotting because his characters are not exactly the most interesting. The main thing that keeps you engaged in Get Out is the mystery of what will happen next. A slow start is pretty much the only complaint I have against Get Out. For the most part, this is a very compelling film, especially once it hits its stride in the third act.

The ending of this film is one for the ages, the plot of the story is well crafted and the subject matter is very much relevant to what’s going on today. It’s hard to find anything bad to say about this movie. It’s amazing that this movie exists and that it was released in February. It’s a huge move for Jordan Peele who seems to be branching out from comedy to filmmaking and it’s a movie that will reward multiple viewings. Can you tell that I liked this movie?

Go watch it. You will not be disappointed.

Green Room (2016) Review: Beautiful and Violent Genre Perfection

Green Room is the third feature film of Jeremy Saulnier, known for also directing 2013’s Blue Ruin. The big name actors in Green Room are Anton Yelchin and Patrick Stewart. Sadly Yelchin stands out in this film for having recently died in a freak accident at a young age. Stewart is incredible as the leader of a group of neo-nazis in rural Oregon.

Green Room is essentially the story of a punk band’s misfortune on tour. Early on we see Yelchin’s character and another band member siphoning gasoline from cars in a nearby parking lot. But what can you expect? This is a hardcore punk band comprised of three young men and one woman so its not surprising to see them steal. The film establishes its characters early on so we can understand the consequences of what happens later. Through a series of bad events, the band accepts a gig playing at rural bar that they discover is filled with neo-nazis. After their set, the band stumbles upon a dead girl in the green room which sets of a series of events with grisly implications. The band becomes trapped in the green room while nazis plan to kill them to cover up the murder.

That’s really the gist of this film. There’s no obvious deeper meaning. This is a very primal and human movie. I found it incredibly refreshing. I feel like every movie I see these days pretends to have something deep on its mind. Every once in a while, it’s nice to see a movie with no pretensions whatsoever. It’s very clear who is bad and who is good and its beautiful to watch. That’s the other great thing about this movie. It’s absolutely stunning as a technical and visual achievement. Saulnier and his team have proven themselves adept at making movies. It’s only a matter of time before Saulnier rises to greater heights because his level of talent can only stay hidden for so long.

Green Room is an incredibly violent movie but each act of violence is felt deeply by its characters. Sometimes movies like Green Room can become sort of cartoonish in their overuse of violence. I find this off-putting. I don’t watch movies to laugh my ass of like a little kid when someone’s head get chopped off. Some of the special effects are a bit phony looking for my taste but I appreciate what Green Room is trying to do. Saulnier and company are trying to make a fun genre movie for people like me. It’s a movie that would appeal to the band members in the movie. It’s brutal and doesn’t give a fuck. The writing in this movie is also phenomenal. Dialogue creates a sense of history and purpose for the characters without getting too deep.

Watching Green Room is like taking a class in how to create a low-budget horror thriller hybrid. I will definitely be watching this film again so I can soak up how it achieved its effectiveness. I love that Green Room is the movie Saulnier decided to make after Blue Ruin, because while I enjoyed Blue Ruin, it didn’t have that much of an effect on me. Green Room on the other hand is the kind of movie that I find perfect in every way.